installation

Some irritation due to extended output of systemd / systemctl status for sysv services


Bad is an unpleasant word, right? “On” or “off” implies some final statement, or “failed” may signal something wrong but at least terminated. But “bad”… uuuhh, blameworthy, guilty, unaccountable, still being around. Ok, before diving into linguistic depression, the change eventually turned out simple and was actually in good faith but, however, produced remarkable irritation. You know, systemctl status {service} will show an overview of some systemd unit definition with load state, current activity and so on. The load state, in particular, details, in parantheses, into the path of the unit file, the enablement and the vendor enablement preset, respectively. Original systemd units may give a load state as follows:

Loaded: loaded (/usr/lib/systemd/system/atop.service; enabled; vendor preset: disabled)

However, systemd units, that have just been derived from systemv init scripts, only printed the init script path since lately:

Loaded: loaded (/etc/rc.d/init.d/sysv-thing)

The new irritating factor now is an extension for those derived systemv init scripts, to also state the enablement, but show up as “bad” for the running enablement for whatever weird reason:

Loaded: loaded (/etc/rc.d/init.d/sysv-thing; bad; vendor preset: disabled)

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Splitting a btrfs 4.1x root partition with debian live system gparted btrfs tools 3.17-x


This is a short picture log of doing a btrfs 4.1x root partition split on a (down) oracle linux 7.2 using a debian live system applying gparted based on btrfs tools 3.17-x. Lot’s of names and version codecs, right? But this is what matters. The important message is : it works using this flavours.
Actually, running oracle or redhat linux as the live system may have been much more appropriate concerning compatibility reasons. The odd things is, no redhat-based (enterprise) linux system features gparted. Only fedora does, sourcing the epel-repository but not having kinf of a live system release as debian.

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Investigating DBV-00201: Block, DBA number, marked corrupt for invalid redo application


More or less forced 😉 by the procedures discussed in my last post (Rman duplicating an oracle 11g database in active state on the same host), this post will investigate how to verify and fix data corruption induced by RMan trying to restore nologging objects. Indeed, we know, there’s no actual restore of nologging objects, since there’s no cold or hot redo to process. But what does this mean in practice? Me, I learned now. Let’s have a look.

Ok, there’re some (partitioned) tables in the database duplicated, previous post, that for performance reasons (see : Oracle global temp tabs or nologgingappend saved redo in numbers) have been set nologging. I won’t explain the why here, that’s another subject, but, however, the first post-duplicate database backup showed up with block corruption errors in Quest’s Backup Reporter for Oracle Community. I today examined the overall database integrity status with a rman validate, verified the affected tablespace, but rman list failures, asking Data Recovery Advisor under the covers, did not seem to be up to complain about anything. We see that 10 blocks have been marked corrupt but the file check status is ok though.

RMAN> validate check logical database;
Starting validate at 22.07.2016-08:55:54
allocated channel: ORA_DISK_1
...
File Status Marked Corrupt Empty Blocks Blocks Examined High SCN
---- ------ -------------- ------------ --------------- ----------
31   OK     10             58357        557056          8784584429990
  File Name: H:\ORACLE\SAN_4\ORADATA\UTL_01.DBF
  Block Type Blocks Failing Blocks Processed
  ---------- -------------- ----------------
  Data       0              265313
  Index      0              223903
  Other      0              9483
...
File Type    Status Blocks Failing Blocks Examined
------------ ------ -------------- ---------------
SPFILE       OK     0              2
Control File OK     0              778
Finished validate at 22.07.2016-08:59:46

RMAN> list failure all;
no failures found that match specification

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Rman duplicating an oracle 11g database in active state on the same host


I already published a post about rman> duplicate... a couple of years ago (Rman duplicating an oracle database in a new sid two host scenario), still on 10g at that time and using a backup set being transfered to a new host. With 11g, however, rman> duplicate... offers another option to not only restore from a source backup, leaving source online, but from an up and running database (with takes archivelog mode and some rman catalogued entries in the control file or catalogue nevetheless). Following below therefore, I’m going to show the do’s for an rman> duplicate ... from active database... in a same host scenario, on windows again, using orapwd and oradim as well as lsnrctl this time. The main difference, however, is employing the spfile clause of the duplicate command, such that rman will set up the destination spfile on its own. Only some file name mappings, actually like before, need to be specified. My main reference to review any new features was Duplicating a Database from the oracle 11g1 docs, other references, concerning errors that showed up underway, will be given below.

Ok, working on the same host, nothing is due to be done for software installation and stuff and we can immediately set up the new instance (note that source will be denoted tgt, for target and the destination aux for auxiliary, respectively). Firstly, we create a new password file for destination, with the same sysdba password as on source.

cd /d e:\oracle\product\11.2.0\dbhome_1\database
orapwd file=PWDAUX.ora ignorecase=y force=y

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Btrfs subvolume quota still in its infancy with btrfs version 4.2.2


Ever tried to dive into the btrfs subvolume topic, especially in combination with quotas (not snapshots here)? Looks really promising… administring subvolumes in hierarchies automagically offers managing quotas on (summed up) top- and on (dedicated) sub-levels by design, see : Btrfs SysadminGuide Subvolumes or Btrfs: Subvolumes and snapshots for example. With the later 4.x kernels there is btrfs 4.2.2, representing a huge step forward in btrfs development, so thought to give it another try on a red hat / oracle uek based 7.2 system.

Following, I’m going to show what I attempted to achive, the how-to’s, the workarounds I tried and, intermixed, the quite odd behaviour that I observed. Odd to an magnitude, that makes me recommed everyone to stay averse against employing this promising but still semifinished (?) technology.

The setup of a subvolume, dedicated for quota control is quite easy and takes only a couple of keystrokes. Understand though, that quota control with btrfs can only be enabled throughout the entire filesystem but can then be set to a value dedicatetly.

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