Understanding “occurrences before alerts” in oracle enterprise manager 13c


The Incident Manager within Oracle Enterprise Manager 13c is a powerful tool for monitoring a wealth of target types such as databases, hosts, middleware or just services in general from a bird’s eye view or right down into the manifold details of a dedicated application. As with all powerful means around, where there is a lot of power, there also usually is a lot to do wrong (or even employ counterproductive). This is why it is important to understand the Incident Manager concepts from bottom up and be able to identify the knobs and wheels to poke with to meet a certain requirement.

Basically, Incident Manager is a professional toolset to facilitate the management of non-critical and critical system alerts against metric values (registered as problems and incidents, see About Incidents and Problems) in a larger quantity and time scale along with alert management templating and alert assigment and so forth.
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Splitting a btrfs 4.1x root partition with debian live system gparted btrfs tools 3.17-x


This is a short picture log of doing a btrfs 4.1x root partition split on a (down) oracle linux 7.2 using a debian live system applying gparted based on btrfs tools 3.17-x. Lot’s of names and version codecs, right? But this is what matters. The important message is : it works using this flavours.
Actually, running oracle or redhat linux as the live system may have been much more appropriate concerning compatibility reasons. The odd things is, no redhat-based (enterprise) linux system features gparted. Only fedora does, sourcing the epel-repository but not having kinf of a live system release as debian.

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The look of : transaction deadlock due to missing foreign key index


This about transaction deadlocks resulting from an index missing on foreign key colum(s). Actually, the post will not dive into the odds resulting from this failure but show how to detect this dedicated reason for an “ORA-00060: deadlock detected while waiting for resource” message. In particular, what to look out for in the trace file and how to find the table objects (instead of rows) being deadlocked against each other. The best resource on the web tackling this subject is of course (Reading deadlock trace files) from Tom Kyte, which also guided me along the way of a “no row deadlock”, see below.
Ok, on first place, some tool, Enterprise Manager for example, or whatever will notify you about entries in the alert.log, reading roughly the like as “Sun May 29 02:51:07 2016 ORA-00060: Deadlock detected. More info in file H:\ORACLE\diag\rdbms\got\got\trace\got_ora_4536.trc“. Inspecting the trace file, you should focus your attention on the first 70 lines, in most cases neglegting the trailing process information dumps. I got this, anything noteworthy will be highlighted and discussed below:

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Oracle database 11g administrator certified professional finally


ocp_odb11gadmin_clr Last thursday. Glad I’ve managed to get this completed aside every day work now. Took the Oracle Database 11g: New Features for Administrators 1Z0-050 upgrade path (Oracle Database 11g – Certification Path). Weird, the exam comprises so many topics that are really expensive in terms of (additional) enterprise edition options to be licenced for operation set up (Oracle Technology Global Price List).

Peter

Using the DataImportHandler XPathEntityProcessor on a Database Resultset Column


The Solr documentation for XPathEntityProcessor introduces a spezialization subtype of EntityProcessor that is primarily depicted to process data (to be) imported from xml/http-datasources (for example, Usage with XML/HTTP Datasource). However, using XPathEntityProcessor on a FieldReaderDataSource instead on the original URLDataSource or !HttpDataSource (search for FieldReaderDataSource in Uploading Structured Data Store Data with the Data Import Handler) enables reading xml instances contained in columns delivered from database requests through SqlEntityProcessor.
Bewildered out of words and meanings…? Don’t worry, the following will give you a living example of how to craft the xml from an Oracle database easily and what to do on the Solr side to map the information datums into indexing fields. To me, this is really a nice example of how to employ xml in a true sense of a defined (well-forming, encoding) data exchange layer, hiding most if not all of the implementation details of xml processing on the database and on the search-engine. Note however, that this great time-to-market, through xml processing technically, always comes at a certain extra cost such that the xml-instances shall not become to large for this solution pattern. I will also use xml attributes for small size values instead of tags in the xml generation as one step of optimization.

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