flashback

Flashback version query and the proper use of timestamp and scn clauses

Flashback version query essentially enables you to lookup the incarnations of a row (defined by primary key) in the past, in a consecutive manner. Version information is depicted by a couple of pseudo-columns, namely versions_xid, versions_startscn, versions_endscn, versions_starttime, versions_endtime and versions_operation. See Using Oracle Flashback Version Query in the docs for explanations.

In combination with flashback query or flashback transaction query, one may restore a row incarnation from the past into a new table or even rollback to a past row incarnation within the same table.

This article will discuss flashback version query together with flashback query to restore one to many rows, just shown for a row of a unique key here for brevity, detailing when and when not to use timestamp and scn select where clauses to prevent pitfalls. An example table / dataset will be given, representing a real world scenario where some past data needs to be identified first and is then to be made available again.

Flashback version query uses the following pattern, including the pseudo-columns introduced above, on an actual application-, but not a system-table (alike flashback transaction query). A timestamp– or scn-range must be supplied to define the lookup window (defined by the stock of the available undo-data, remember) and to actually populate the pseudo-columns, respectively:

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Undo retention, flashback query and ora-01555 snapshot too old

Setting up a fault aware database environment is in charge of regarding possible physical and logical error scenarios. On the physical side of the medal, you got real-application-cluster or dataguard at your disposal. The logical one usually comprises backup and replication. Recently, oracle and others introduced features that enables a database to recover from logical errors without or with less remote systems and data. Namely flashback is a powerful technology to look back into (query), back out (transaction) or fully restore (database) the history of data. Flashback of course takes accompanying (history) (meta)data to do its job, namely again, undo-before-images, archived-redo-logs and flashback-logs. So, essentially, the convenience of your course into history depends on the amount of history metadata that is available to the database at the time of a logical error, say an inadvertant delete from.

You may already have learned or heard about or even hardly experienced that flashback-logs may be purged from the recovery-area in favour of archived-redo-logs, rendering your configured flashback-retention-time (DB_FLASHBACK_RETENTION_TARGET) a value of theory. So far, sizing the file-system recovery-area is a task to be performed in a clear-sighted manner. The same is true then for undo-before-images (compare to logs) und the undo-tablespace (compare to area) to accomodate enough data to meet your configured undo-retention-time (UNDO_RETENTION) in UNDO_MANAGEMENT=AUTO mode, while in addition still support long running workload queries (not to overwrite old undo). This article discusses the usability of the (enterprise-manager) undo-advisor in sizing your undo-tablespace to always foster successful flashback queries up to the configured undo-retention-time (as opposed to the nasty surprise of getting an ora-01555, see below, which is also misleading here, imho, in suggesting that the undo-tablespace is to small now, as we know it from workload queries – nope, it has been to small before now, in the past, as regarded to flashback queries – also see : ora-01555 snapshot too old when running flashback query).

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